(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The manufacture and properties of iron and steel"

GREAT BRITAIN".
517
TABLE XXIII-K Production of Pig Iron in South Wales and Monmouthshire.
Average for period per year ; tons.	Glamorganshire.	Monmouthshire.	Total.
1882 to 1885 inclusive ...........	• 380,361	490,857	871,218
1886 to 1890 inclusive ........	369,447	421,772	791,219
1891 to 1895 inclusive ...........	438,333	269,386	707,719
1896 to 1900 inclusive ...........	479,361*	294,256*	' 773,617
1901 to 1903 inclusive ...........	521,058*	220,908*	741,966
			
* The Home Office Reports, beginning in 1900, combines North and South Wales. I have assumed that Denbigh, in North Wales, makes 20,000 tons of pig iron per year, and Flint 30,000 tons.
TABLE XXIII-0. Imports of Ore on the Bristol Channel.
Average for period per year ; tons.	Cardiff.	Newport.	Swansea.	Others.	Total.
1882 to 1885 inclusive ..........	544,000	697,000	153,000	1,000	1,395,000
1886 to 1890 inclusive ..........	528,000	693,000	123,000	4,000	1.348,000
1891 to 1895 inclusive ..........	601,000	430,000	150,000	8,000	1,183,000
1896 to 1900 incluRive. . . .....	693,000	475,000	218,000	1,000	1,388,000
1901 to 1903 inclusive ..........	769,000	316,000	169,000	3,000	1,257,000
					
gives the principal plants in the district, and Tables XXIII-N and 0 give certain statistics.
SEC. XXIIIe.—Lancashire and Cumberland:
I am indebted to Mr. J. M. "While, general manager of the Barrow Works, for reading the manuscript relating to this district.
The county of Lancaster reaches across Morecambe Bay and includes Barrow-in-Furness and the Barrow Steel "Works. It is in this detached portion of Lancashire and the neighboring portion of Cumberland that all the ore is raised and a great part of the iron and steel made. It is the custom, however, to keep the records by geographical lines, and the output of Barrow-in-Furness is combined with the output of South Lancashire and sometimes with that of Derby. This last named county produces no ore, but its output of both coal and pig-iron is two-thirds as much as Lancashire.
The especial feature of Cumberland and northwest Lancashire is the deposit of what are known as West Coast hematites. Up to 1830 these beds were little known and no pig-iron was smelted in either Cumberland or Lancashire. In 1854 the production of ore